Calling Javelina

Jim Taylor
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 19:13 (21 days ago)

The air was crisp as I shouldered my backpack. It was about an hour before dawn and I had a good half-hour hike to get to where I had seen the Javelina herd. I wanted to be in position before daylight. During the hike out I enjoyed the beauty of the Arizona mountains and the dawning of a new day.

It seemed to be just a short walk and I was at the canyon mouth I was seeking. Following on old trail I slowly eased my way down the hillside till I was about 30 yards from the canyon bottom. I sat down in the concealment of some brush and waited for the sun to rise so I could see the mountainside opposite of me. I could see tracks near the water in the canyon bottom and began to feel a stir of excitement.

As the light began to filter through the canyon I got out my Burnham Brothers Deluxe Fox call and started to blow softly through it. I gave about 5 soft calls and stopped to see what would happen. In just a few moments I spotted some movement near the top of the mountain, about 300 yards away. I thought at first it was a coyote, but when I looked through my binoculars I discovered it was a large Javelina making its way down the mountain toward me!

I gave a few more calls and the pig continued to come down the mountain through the brush. When it got to the edge of the brush about 150 yards from me it seemed reluctant to leave its cover. I called, but to no avail. At length I could see it begin to make its way back up the mountain. It would stop and listen when I called, but would not come to me.

I noticed some more movement near the top and looking through my glasses revealed several other Javelina milling around. I decided the only thing to do was to get nearer.

There was a trail that circled around the mountain and would take me near the top, out of sight and smell of the Javelina. I began to work my way up the trail, and after about 15 minutes of climbing I cut off and headed over to where I had last seen the little porkers. When I thought I was near the place I got down in some deep grass and began blowing on the call. In just a moment I heard the "woof-woof" of the pigs as they moved toward me.

I had my gun ready as the first one came into sight, but the brush was so thick that I just couldn’t see them long enough to risk a shot. The pigs stayed about 25 to 30 yards out and circled me, curious but wary. After playing this game for 10 minutes or so I decided to try and move in closer.

Moving as quietly as I could I eased my way through the thick brush. At different times I spotted Javelina, but no good shots were seemingly available. I worked my way to the top of the mountain, and as I came over the top I saw movement to my left. I froze and slowly turned to see what it was. There, about 50 yards away, were 15 to 20 Javelina feeding in a clump of mesquite trees.

I had my call out again, and at the noise one came running directly at me at full speed! At 25 feet or so I touched it off and the pig squealed and went down. I could tell that I had missed a good hit and had broken it’s back! My next shot took it through the neck and finished it on the spot. It was a large sow.

The gun was my old model Ruger .45 and the load was the 300 gr. #457191 bullet with 18.5 gr. 2400 fired by a rifle primer. This was the 4th Javelina taken with this gun and load.

I cleaned the skull and found that the neck shot had broken the bones on the base of the skull where the neck joins it. It had nice tusks and makes a good looking trophy. The real problem was carrying the pig home. It was far enough that I was wore out by the time I got back to the house!

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Here are a few of Javelina my family and I have taken over the years.

1985 - Tom Peterson (left) Trooper .357 --my Dad S&W 584 .357
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1985 - My daughter (13 years old) .22 Magnum
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1986 - Ruger .45 Colt
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1987 - Freedom Arms 454
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1988 - 1858 Remington .44 cap and ball
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1997 - .41 Magnum
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2002 - Reeder Sixgunner Special .45 Colt
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2005 - 480 Achilles
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Sorry .. my Dad's gun is a S&W 586 .357

Jim Taylor
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 19:14 (21 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

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Some fun times. Thanks for sharing.

Mark Conner
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 19:40 (21 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

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They are moving up here more and mor

Gary Reeder
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 11:24 (20 days ago) @ Mark Conner

every year. The last one I shot was rooting around in about 8" of snow. I smelled him before I got close enough to see him. I called my dogs back thinking it was a skunk. I eased up thru the junipers and shuffled thru the snow with the smell getting stronger every step. I had the 2 Jack Russells leashed to my belt so they didn't get on the skunk. As I came around a big Juniper I saw the "skunk". It was a big Javelina just digging away at the roots of that cactus. He didn't seem bothered by the snow or the 28 degree temperatures. I had my 300 GNR revolver with me and gave one of the rounds as a gift to the Javelina. He ran in a small circle and then ran out of gas and fell over. I cut the hams off and wrapped them in some newspaper and put them in the front floorboard of the Bronco and tied the dogs up in the back to keep them away from the meat. I have heard it is good eating if done right but have never tried it myself. I gave them to a Mexican friend who was my guide out on the Navajo Depot military base elk hunting. I have shot a few more down south of here more in desert country. But the Javelina are becoming more and more abundant up here in the mountains.

Years ago when I was hunting them

Jim Taylor
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 11:42 (20 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

they were not even up to Prescott. But they were heading that way.

With me living on the east coast, the taking

james
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 19:40 (21 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

of seven javelina with a handgun is like winning the World Series.....:-) Good for you....

Thank you my friend ... but I lived among them ...

Jim Taylor
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 19:59 (21 days ago) @ james

we had Javelina in our yard sometimes every night ... usually 6 or 8 times a month ... rooting up flower beds .. eating the dogs food ... fighting over the peaches fallen from our trees. I never had to go far to find them. I shot a lot more than I have photos of..

Perhaps I would have had better luck if

JT
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Tuesday, November 15, 2022, 20:54 (21 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

I didn't depend on calling "Here pig pig pig, here pig pig pink, come on piggy."

You should have tried this ...

Jim Taylor
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 07:27 (20 days ago) @ JT

I WAS NEVER THAT THIN!

JT
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 08:24 (20 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

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Very rare and unique critters worldwide.

WB
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 08:22 (20 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

I have always been attracted to them. I hear you can eat them but an old sage told me once, "You can eat a bowling ball too, but why?".

I bought a Javelina "Call" before the first HHC Redo in TX. We were night hunting as allowed from an elevated blind. The Javelina call sounds downright scary, like you are torturing something pitifully. We called in two big sows with the call! I guess they thought we were abusing some little piggies. Javelina are not "pigs" but the call crossed over and worked!

we ate them quite regularly ..

Jim Taylor
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 08:47 (20 days ago) @ WB

My wife made wonderful tacos and burritos with the meat as well as other meals ... extremely lean meat. Those who say you can't eat them did something wrong and blamed it on the animal.

The scientific name for Javelina is tayassuidae while the name for pigs is suidae. They are close enough that the Javelina grunt and squeal like pigs, root like pigs, have the same bathroom habits as pigs, use their noses like pigs and generally act like pigs.

Their "correct" name is "Collared Peccary." There are 3 different types of peccaries but the Collared Peccary is the only one to be found in the United States. The others are in Mexico, Central and South America.

We like to eat them. We have a lot of them around here.

Brent Foy
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Wednesday, November 16, 2022, 16:32 (20 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

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They are far from "rare" and are found

Gary Reeder
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Thursday, November 17, 2022, 10:38 (19 days ago) @ WB

all over Arizona plus all of the other western states. Down in Sedona herds of them come into folk's yards and eat everything that grows.

A couple of our stink pigs. 2 Kase got with his

Gary Reeder
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Friday, November 18, 2022, 14:29 (18 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

custom 45 Long Colt, plus a small one I shot and one Blake Naugle got with a 45 Super and Sean Harper's stink pig with an 8mm GNR. And a couple of mounts of ours.[image]
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