Super Blackhawk

TM
[subject]
Tuesday, July 02, 2024, 08:43 (16 days ago)

I like the Trail Hawk Conversion but I already have a 4 5/8 Super Blackhawk that is just fine. One question, can it handle some of the hotter loads, most likely 300 gr. hard cast for wandering onto bear territory while fly fishing in some of the western states. Probably never see a bear but it doesn't hurt to be prepared and give it some thought.

Our single action 44 is, in most cases, a

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, July 02, 2024, 10:49 (16 days ago) @ TM

5 shot, which gives it thicker walls and much more strength. No gun is idiot proof but a 5 shot cylinder is the way to go when in bear country. That would be when carrying a single action.

I have a Super Blackhawk in 4&5/8"

BigBoreGuy
[subject]
Tuesday, July 02, 2024, 12:23 (16 days ago) @ TM

Gary knows best and my experience is pretty much the same. What I have found is that if you're staying within SAAMI specs or close to them with 300gr. hard casts, the Super Blackhawk is fine as-is. But... Those Buffalo Bore and Underwood 340gr. +P+ loads are too much for repeated use in my humble opinion. They have pressure way over SAAMI specs. In that case, I'd go 5-shot conversion like Gary said. Or you can go with a few other options that I have found hold up to those loads, being Redhawk, Super Redhawk, or the BFR. Again, this is just my two cents, and I defer to Gary as he has much more experience than I do.

No plans

TM
[subject]
Tuesday, July 02, 2024, 12:29 (16 days ago) @ BigBoreGuy

to "hot rod" it or go over SAMI specs. 300 gr. hard cast is probably the biggset round I would shoot thru it. No desire to shoot Buffalo Bore.

Smart move. I don't know of any animal that can tell

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, July 02, 2024, 15:47 (16 days ago) @ TM

a 300 grain at 1300 from a 400 at 1400. but the gun itself will tell, by shaking loose and wearing out parts real quick. I have always opted for a medium weight bullet at reasonable speed. I have seen 2 elephant taken with my 510 GNR and a 350 grain hard cast gas checked bullet at 1300 fps. Both were taken with 2 rounds each.
John Abraham, my African PH is offering me the African hunt of a lifetime, an old bull elephant with my revolver in 510 GNR. I would like to say I have taken an elephant but I really don't feel good about it. The bull would be an old bull way past his breeding age, probably close to 100 years old. He is just trying to die a peaceful death with nobody bothering him. But the game commission wants me to put the old fellow down and I just don't agree with that. The good side would be it would feed a couple of villages of natives for a few weeks but there is another side. As I get older the years I have left are special and I am sure it is the same with a 100 year old bull elephant. But the game commission has a drawing every year and the PH gets one permit in a lifetime but I would rather pass on it and let some young stud have the experience.
I do want to go on one more African lion hunt with my 510 GNR revolver. That is out of 16 hunts in Africa my favorite hunt.
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Sorry to get off the subject of extreme heavy bullets at hyper speeds. I just remember good friend John Taffin telling more than one young hunter on here that it isn't the bullet weight and it isn't the bullet's speed. It is where you put the bullet that counts.
And if you have pissed off this fellow and he is at 10 yards you better put that bullet in the right spot.
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Sorry for changing the tone of the post from

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Tuesday, July 02, 2024, 17:08 (16 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

ammo to African hunting.

Gary, you are waxing nostalgic. I am impressed.

Winnturner48
[subject]
Thursday, July 04, 2024, 12:02 (14 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

- No text -

Back in the day it was the SBH vs the M29

WB
[subject]
Friday, July 05, 2024, 08:03 (13 days ago) @ BigBoreGuy

The 240 gr. was the standard. Everyone knew the S&W would need attention (after several thousand rounds) before the SBH. Recoil would eventually shake things loose and wear a bit. Nothing a little maintenance would not fix.

Then I personally think it was folks like Larry Kelly and JD that got the heavy bullet thing in .44 cal. going. Kelly was running all over the world with a .44 Mag. killing critters. They came up with a truncated nose 270 gr. at first, then it got a little wild. I still have several boxes of their plain base SSK 330 gr. Truncated flat nose. It's a bit difficult to load those where they don't recoil harsh! But they were hunting bullets, not intended to shoot thousands through the guns. I run them about 1200 fps and they will shoot clean through a treated power pole!

Ruger came out with the Redhawk in 1979 (nobody saw them till 1980 and later - except Elmer Keith or Bob Milek). Guys were going 300+ gr. on their .44 Mags. It was rough on even the RH. Enough Ruger came out with the "Super" RH. I understand the biggest wear issue (back then) seemed to be the junction of the frame and barrel threads. The Super has this area way overbuilt and threaded area doubled. This and the early issues with thread lock compound really created fun for some gunsmiths working on Super RH.

If you shoot a few dozen heavy loads it unlikely will not present any problems other than a sore palm. It's rough on everyone. But if you want to shoot hundreds (!) it sure helps to have something specifically addressing the rough treatment. Just me remembering and my views. I was a teenager back then and really was excited about it all.

In 1986 I adopted the Freedom Arms 454

Jim Taylor
[subject]
Friday, July 05, 2024, 09:44 (13 days ago) @ WB

and never looked back. My heavy .45 Colt loads in my Ruger stayed around 1100 fps and worked fine. When I wanted to shoot heavy bullets at higher velocities the 454 was the one to use!

With great anticipation I awaited each month the issue

WB
[subject]
Friday, July 05, 2024, 10:22 (13 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

of G&A to see what Ross Seyfried was up to. I worked in a grocery store through high school and Jr. college. We had a magazine rack and I was there when it was fresh stocked.

Ross helped publicize Dick Casull's hot .45 loads and the advent of the .500 Linebaugh, Maximum, and .475 as well. Later in life I got to sample all examples myself first hand. The reality of physics can be harsh. They all basically push holes through stuff, once through, the remaining energy, is a macho waste. I always found the .454 with factory loads particularly unpleasant. Yet I decided I needed one in my collection before the prices got all stupid. My procrastination made me pay a lot more than prior but it was less than half of what they are now!

I never understood Bob's (maybe it was his Dad) smallish trigger guard. The gripframe seems odd too but works ok. I personally don't like it, so I had Gary "fix" it. I was tempted to have some engraving done but somehow the understated Premiere finish seems a bit elegant. It is in my mind and for my purposes the perfect .454.

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Sometime within a hundred years or so I picked

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Friday, July 05, 2024, 12:17 (13 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

up my first Freedom Arms 454. The gun was perfect...for most people. But even being the finest single action ever built it didn't light my fire. I did a lot of changing in my mind to just about everything. The grip just didn't fit my hand. The trigger guard banged my knuckle in just about every caliber except those meant for pussies.
After sitting down and re-making the Freedom Arms perfect design I realized I already had what I was designing in my Ruger Super Blackhawk. Yet it wasn't perfect either so rather than butcher up the perfect freedom Arms I sold it and put all my personal changes onto my Super Blackhawk. And that change continues today probably 3 decades since the first major change I did to my Super Blackhawk. With a couple dozen custom series since that first change (which by the way was my original Gunfighter Grip on the original Black Widow) I find myself thinking of ways to make it "better". Which by the way ain't gonna happen.
The Freedom Arms has withstood the changes of folks like me thru the years and the only change I can see is when Bob Baker called and asked if I would be pissed if he added my Gunfighter Grip to his list of options. I told Bob I would be proud if he added my Gunfighter Grip to his "perfect" Freedom Arms. With the harder thumps the Freedom passes along with the hot 454s and the 500s the Gunfighter Grip (to me) helps tremendously. And of course the Gunfighter Grip is not done to every Freedom Arms gripframe. Some folks just don't like it. It is an option only but in my eyes it is a good one. Nuff said.

It's what makes you a good Custom Smith ...

Jim Taylor
[subject]
Saturday, July 06, 2024, 17:13 (12 days ago) @ Gary Reeder

not being satisfied with what is offered and knowing that you can probably come up with something that will work better for you and that others may like it as well. And not being afraid to experiment.

I grew up on the Colt SAA and that grip shape and size - which is the same as the original Ruger XR3 grip - is what I like the best, especially for "standard" loads. The heavy recoiling pistols I like the FA grip or the Ruger Bisley grip. But I shot heavy loads for years in my old Ruger Blackhawk with the XR3 grips and never wanted anything different.

It's what makes the world go 'round ... different preferences.

I guess I am looking for that perfect handgun

Gary Reeder
[subject]
Monday, July 08, 2024, 13:58 (10 days ago) @ Jim Taylor

and so far I haven't found it.

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